Many people know the story of Harriet Tubman, a fugitive slave who was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and made dozens of trips from South to North, leading hundreds of slaves to freedom.

Tubman used South Jersey sites on some of her passages and worked in a Cape May hotels over several summers to earn money for her journeys. Cape May opened a museum in her honor in recent years.

New Jersey — and South Jersey in particular — played a critical role in the success of the Underground Railroad, a network of safe houses, safe spaces and secret routes.

Abolitionists often provided shelter, food and supplies to assist runaway slaves in their pursuit of freedom.

South Jersey had dozens of documented stops on the Underground Railroad, some more famous than others.

Here are some Underground Railroad sites/towns in South Jersey:

Bethel Othello African Methodist Episcopal Church, Springtown 

This historic church dates from between 1838 and 1841, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. It has been documented as a stop on the Underground Railroad that was used by Tubman.

Springtown is one of the oldest Black settlements in Cumberland County and is located about a mile from the colonial village of Greenwich.

The Bethel Othello African Methodist Episcopal Church in Springtown, N.J., has been documented as a stop on the Underground Railroad that was used by Harriet Tubman in her journeys to lead enslaved people to freedom.

“Springtown and its Bethel A.M.E. Church were involved in the Underground Railroad and included several members who led the Abolitionist movement in the 19th century,” according to the Cumberland County Cultural & Heritage Commission website.

 “The community was an important destination for fugitive slaves leaving Delaware and the eastern shore of Maryland. Greenwich and Springtown were perfectly located geographically for this purpose as they are were settled on a peninsula between the Cohansey River and the Delaware Bay, providing numerous routes by water for incoming runaway slaves.”

The Bethel Othello African Methodist Episcopal Church in Springtown, N.J., which was built in 1838,  has been documented as a stop on the Underground Railroad. The community was an important destination for fugitive slaves.

At that time, the area was swamp and was a well-known landing point for fugitive slaves from Maryland and Delaware that had crossed the Delaware Bay.

The church is located at 1092 Sheppards Mill Road.

Burlington Pharmacy, Burlington City

By 1790, Burlington County had the largest free Black population of any county in the state, according to the Library of Congress, The American Folklore Center

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