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This was expressed by White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki Russian President Vladimir Putin isolation during a pandemic could affect his decision-making if he continues his life-threatening work invasion of Ukraine.

Lawmakers are increasingly questioning Putin’s mental health not only after his decision to launch a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, but also after an appeal suggesting that his military goals exceed those of Kiev.

In this photo from the video published by the press service of the President of Russia, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the people in Moscow, Russia, on Thursday, February 24, 2022.
(Press service of the President of Russia via AP)

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“Last week’s speech … was one that not only justified the invasion of a sovereign country, but clearly had ambitions beyond that,” Psaki told ABC presenter George Stefanopoulos this week. .

Florida Republican Sen. Mark Rubio tweeted this week to question Putin’s sanity and said: “I wish I could share more, but so far I can say that it is clear to many that something is wrong with Putin. ».

“He has always been a killer, but now his problem is different and significant. It would be a mistake to think that Putin would have reacted in the same way as 5 years ago, ”he added.

Psaki said she would not comment on Putin’s mental stability, but said it had become clear that the Kremlin leader was acting under other international rules.

“One of the mistakes we all probably make is that we look at it through the prism of global norms and what the world community thinks is the behavior through which people should act as leaders in the world,” she said. she. “He doesn’t see the world that way.

“He was obviously quite isolated during COVID,” Psaki added. “But I’ll tell you that the rhetoric, the actions, the excuses he makes for his actions are definitely very exciting to us.”

Ukrainian forces have been fighting off Russian troops for four days, despite a significant build-up of troops that Moscow has amassed ahead of its invasion this week.

February 25, 2022 in Kiev, Ukraine, a girl looks at the crater left by the explosion in front of an apartment building that was badly damaged during the ongoing hostilities.

February 25, 2022 in Kiev, Ukraine, a girl looks at the crater left by the explosion in front of an apartment building that was badly damaged during the ongoing hostilities.
(UNICEF)

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Senior defense officials said on Saturday that more than 50 percent of the 150,000 troops stationed along Ukraine’s border had invaded the country.

But Russia has so far failed to gain an advantage in the air or take full control of any Ukrainian city.

The United States and its Western allies have imposed harsh sanctions not only against Russian banks and businesses, but also against Putin and Russia’s top leadership.

Ukrainian military at the site of fighting with a Russian raider group in the Ukrainian capital Kiev on the morning of February 26, 2022

Ukrainian military at the site of fighting with a Russian raider group in the Ukrainian capital Kiev on the morning of February 26, 2022
(SYARGEY SUPINSKY / AFP via Getty Images)

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Major NATO allies, such as Germany, have dropped previous reservations about extreme reactive measures, such as removing Russia from the international banking system SWIFT, and Psaki said on Saturday that 80 percent of Russia’s financial sector has come under sanctions.

“The sanctions we announced yesterday, along with – put Russia on a par with Iran, separating it from the banking system with the world community,” – said Psaki. “This makes it very difficult for President Putin and the Russian government not only to do business but also to help fund greater expansion of their army.”

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